This Explains The Reason Why You Feel Like You Can’t Pee After Sex

Ever wondered why you just can't go after the big O?


Women's Health |

I can’t pee after sex!?

You know the moment: you’ve just had the best romp. Sweaty, glowy and deliciously satisfied, you amble off to the loo, only to sit down and… nothing. You push a bit. Nothing. You panic a bit — because you’ve had it drilled into your head that a post-sex wee a day keeps the UTIs away! Still nothing. Damn it.

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What’s up with that?

According to the experts, when you climax, your body releases an antidiuretic hormone — which makes it more difficult to wee. The hormone, known as vasopressin, reduces the amount of water passed out in your urine — as well as raising your blood pressure and constricting your blood vessels.

But why would this hormone crop up specifically during orgasm? Because, in the chemistry of lurve, when you hit O town, two bonding hormones are released by your brain. The first, oxytocin, gives you all the feels for your bed buddy — it’s the same hormone released during childbirth and is partly responsible for the strong connection between a mom and her bundle of joy. The second is our friend vasopressin, the relationship glue that holds us together. It plays a big role in keeping us monogamous.

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The monogamy hormone…

Get this: Scientists scrutinised the prairie vole, a cute critter known for its monogamous nature — and for releasing vasopressin, just like us humans. They also zeroed in on the meadow vole, which did not release said relationship hormone and subsequently was a bit of a player. And what happened when the white coats introduced vasopressin receptors to this amorous vole cousin? He changed his ways, choosing one partner — even when tempted by others!

So it’s worth not being able to pee for little while post-boot-banging, right?

Just don’t put off hitting the bathroom too long  experts advise going after sex to help prevent urinary tract infections (UTIs).

These 5 conversations will rekindle the flame with your partner. Plus: 5 gynaes share the sex tips that have changed their patients’ lives…

READ MORE ON: Orgasm Tips Sex Sexual Health