5 Simple Ways To Tell Exactly When You’re Ovulating

It's not rocket science...


Women's Health |

There are two reasons you’ll want to know when you are ovulating: you’re trying to fall pregnant or if you’re trying not to fall pregnant. Here are a few methods you can use…

Calendar

You should be ovulating about 14 days before the start of your next period. If you are not sure how long your cycle is, start marking the days of your cycle in your diary – starting with day one on the first day of your period. Once you have established a pattern, you can more or less predict ovulation.

READ MORE: 5 Things Every Woman Needs To Know About Her Fertility

Signs

You might get a slight pain over your ovary at the time of ovulation. The cervical mucus changes a few days before you ovulate, making it easier for sperm to get into the uterus and to the egg that was released. The volume of your discharge will increases and it becomes almost elastic. Your temperature also rises with about half a degree.

Ovulation Sticks

These work just like pregnancy tests – detecting a surge of hormones in your urine. You start using them at the same time of day from about day twelve of your cycle or about 16 days before you think your next period will start. If two lines appear, it means that you will ovulate within the next 24 hours.

READ MORE: “I Used To Smoke – Did I Screw Up My Fertility?”

Fertile Focus

This is a little device that can be bought from pharmacies. You put a drop of spit on a small microscope lens and then look for a fern pattern forming on it when it has dried out. It costs a few hundred rand, but is worth it if you’re going to be using it every month.

Blood Tests

This is usually only used in fertility clinics if you are having problems conceiving. Very important to remember: the natural or rhythm method of pregnancy prevention (not having sex around ovulation) is not very reliable. If falling pregnant will be a catastrophe, try something more reliable!

What you need to know about endometriosis and your fertility. Plus: The 7 scary conditions that Pap smears don’t test for. 

READ MORE ON: Fertility Health Health Advice Pregnancy